When

7th to 9th August, 2014 06:30 am - 05:45 pm

Register Now!

Where

UC Berkeley

Subscribe & Share

Download   Featuring   Grid   List

Thursday, 7th August 2014

Time Wheeler Auditorium Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Wheeler Plaza
9:00 am AHS14 BEGINS: OPENING REMARKS
by Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D., Brent Pottenger, MHA, MD cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

AHS14 BEGINS: OPENING REMARKS

By:
Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D., Brent Pottenger, MHA, MD cand.
August 7, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:15 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
   
9:05 am    
9:10 am    
9:15 am POSTER PREVIEWS
by Poster Presenters
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

POSTER PREVIEWS

One slide, one minute overviews of the AHS14 poster presentations.

By:
Poster Presenters
August 7, 2014, 9:15 am to 9:35 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
   
9:20 am    
9:25 am    
9:30 am    
9:35 am Long Break so everyone going to Bancroft can make their way.    
9:40 am    
9:45 am    
9:50 am    
9:55 am    
10:00 am    
10:05 am    
10:10 am Zoobiquity: Species-Spanning Medicine
by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, M.D., M.A., B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Zoobiquity: Species-Spanning Medicine

Animals and humans get the same diseases, yet physicians and veterinarians do not often consult one another. Spontaneously-occurring diseases such as cancer, heart disease, obesity, and infection as well as psychiatric conditions including self-injury, compulsive grooming, sexual dysfunction and substance-seeking affect not only people but a broad range of animal species. An integrated, interdisciplinary approach using the latest in medical and veterinary science to understand physical and behavioral health can lead to novel insights, hypotheses, and innovative therapies. This species-spanning approach challenges academic institutions, clinical practitioners, pharmaceutical companies, and biotech firms to recognize comparative medicine as a translational science, bringing knowledge from the veterinary medicine to the human hospital bedside.

By:
Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, M.D., M.A., B.A.
August 7, 2014, 10:10 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Clinicians
Fructose and Fructophobia. The Threat to Paleo. And the Opportunity.
by Richard Feinman, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Fructose and Fructophobia. The Threat to Paleo. And the Opportunity.

Opportunity: Current obsession with fructose provides a good platform for studying metabolism. Understanding how the cell decides to go in the direction of fat or glycogen synthesis and whether there is a unique effect of fructose, is an intellectual opportunity.

Threat: If we act as if fructose is separate from normal metabolism, biochemical knowledge will be misused and no new knowledge will be gathered. If we delude ourselves into thinking we only need to substitute glucose for fructose — high starch was as rare in paleolithic times as sugar — we will make little progress in obesity, diabetes and related problems.

By:
Richard Feinman, Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 10:10 am to 10:50 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
10:15 am  
10:20 am  
10:25 am  
10:30 am  
10:35 am  
10:40 am  
10:45 am  
10:50 am Break  
10:55 am  
11:00 am Functional Frivolity: Human Brain Evolution and Play as an Adaptation for Childhood Learning and Education
by Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Functional Frivolity: Human Brain Evolution and Play as an Adaptation for Childhood Learning and Education

Despite appearing frivolous, play is a special adaptation for normal human brain development. I review human brain evolution, and describe how play is an adaptation to teach children how to be a successful hunter gatherer. The modern educational system, by contrast, arose during industrial period and is maladapted for brain and cognitive development. The result is an epidemic of developmental and mood disorders. Recent movements in developmental and educational psychology advocate a return to the natural conditions that foster development of a child into an intelligent, creative, and happy individual.

By:
Aaron Blaisdell, Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 11:00 am to 11:40 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Academics or Researchers
Recreating Old Behaviors in a New World: A Crazy Paradox of How Quantified Self Technologies and the Internet of Things Will Help Us Live More Like Our Ancestors
by Daniel Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. Cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Recreating Old Behaviors in a New World: A Crazy Paradox of How Quantified Self Technologies and the Internet of Things Will Help Us Live More Like Our Ancestors

For an individual, adopting new behavioral practices can be challenging. However, sustaining desired health behavior long term is even harder. Why? This presentation will explore the various determinants of behavior, theories and research on behavior change, and new and future technologies aimed to empower behavior modification. For the ancestral health movement to gain mind share and adoption momentum, models need to be established to demonstrate successful use cases for how mainstream individuals can both adopt and sustain alternative lifestyle practices informed by ancestral health philosophy and research. This presentation will show how behavioral science and new technology can empower this mission. Do you have an idea, philosophy, or product that you want a group to adopt or test? This presentation will give you strategies you can use.

By:
Daniel Pardi, M.S., Ph.D. Cand.
August 7, 2014, 11:00 am to 11:40 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Academics or Researchers
 
11:05 am  
11:10 am  
11:15 am  
11:20 am  
11:25 am  
11:30 am  
11:35 am  
11:40 am Break  
11:45 am  
11:50 am Re-Savaging the Gut, Solution to the Identity Crisis of the Ancestral Gut
by Grace Liu, PharmD
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Re-Savaging the Gut, Solution to the Identity Crisis of the Ancestral Gut

The gut microbiota has undergone radical changes. Human gut anatomy are unaltered but the microbial ecosystems have degraded. Health may mirror these changes and how we acquire our microbiota including the ways we procure our food -- shifting at the neolithic from tedious hand foraging to village crops to (now) massive, post-industrial farming operations and livestock production. Our distance from the dirt is immeasurable. New technology allows characterization of the ancestral gut. Comparatively, species in ancestral and non-industrialized guts are robust in diversity and less fragile in balance. Ways to resolve this 'gut identity' crisis involve re-wilding and revisiting the ancestral, soil-connected gut.

By:
Grace Liu, PharmD
August 7, 2014, 11:50 am to 12:10 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
From Teflon to Tang - Proposed Effective Training Methods for In-Mission Astronauts, with Take-Aways for the Earthbound Mortal
by Keith Norris, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

From Teflon to Tang - Proposed Effective Training Methods for In-Mission Astronauts, with Take-Aways for the Earthbound Mortal

Contrary to popular belief, neither Tang nor Teflon were created for or by NASA. Rather, these technologies existed previously, and were co opted by space agency to satisfy mission-specific needs. The success of Tang and Teflon's association with the space program then propelled their representative "brands" in the public's consciousness. In much the same way, the technology and know-how now exists to prevent one of the most limiting obstacles to prolonged spaceflight -- muscle-wasting and bone deterioration (sarcopenia and osteoporosis). What can be done to curtail in-flight muscle-wasting and bone loss, and how might this knowledge transform training protocols on earth?

By:
Keith Norris, B.A.
August 7, 2014, 11:50 am to 12:10 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Fitness Professionals
 
11:55 am  
12:00 pm  
12:05 pm  
12:10 pm Break  
12:15 pm Lessons From the Vegans: What the Paleo Movement Can Learn From the Success of Plant-Based Diets
by Denise Minger
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Lessons From the Vegans: What the Paleo Movement Can Learn From the Success of Plant-Based Diets

The paleo diet has a growing reputation for assisting in weight loss, managing or treating chronic disease, and boosting quality of life for those who follow its tenets. Yet low-fat, plant-based diets -- which are also gaining popularity in the mainstream -- appear to produce similar successes using a vastly different approach. How can such a dissimilar diet have health effects that mirror those of paleo? This presentation examines the reasons behind the success of plant-based diets, and discusses what the paleo movement can learn from them. In doing so, we'll gain a new perspective on the strengths and weaknesses of the paleo philosophy and question some common paleo "truths" that may not be as solid as we currently believe.

By:
Denise Minger
August 7, 2014, 12:15 pm to 12:35 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
The Four Pillars of World Cuisine: Updating our Definition of the Original Human Diet
by Cate Shanahan, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Four Pillars of World Cuisine: Updating our Definition of the Original Human Diet

When speaking of food, unlike history, you must study the past to repeat it. In a quest to better define ancestral diets we conducted a survey of available evidence on foodways among self-sufficient cultures over the past five hundred years. The survey included anthropologic literature, personal interviews, cookbooks dating back to 1700, and relevant TV programming and documentaries. We discovered that two principles discriminate the most desirable from the less desirable foods available today. We then identified four categories of foodways practiced by all people surveyed. Today, few Americans eat all Four Pillars and deficiency diseases result.

By:
Cate Shanahan, M.D.
August 7, 2014, 12:15 pm to 12:35 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
12:20 pm  
12:25 pm  
12:30 pm  
12:35 pm Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall  
12:40 pm  
12:45 pm  
12:50 pm  
12:55 pm  
1:00 pm  
1:05 pm  
1:10 pm  
1:15 pm  
1:20 pm  
1:25 pm  
1:30 pm  
1:35 pm  
1:40 pm  
1:45 pm  
1:50 pm  
1:55 pm  
2:00 pm  
2:05 pm Rethinking Fatigue: the Adrenal Myth
by Nora Gedgaudas, CNS, CNT
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Rethinking Fatigue: the Adrenal Myth

What is frequently referred to as “adrenal fatigue” or “adrenal exhaustion” seems to be an epidemic complaint in our modern world, but are our failing adrenals really to blame? In 1956 Canadian endocrinologist, Hans Selye, often thought of as the “father of stress physiology” proposed a model of adrenal decline that advances predictably in stages. Although still widely taught today this model no longer proves true in modern stress physiology research, despite widespread acceptance of this now outdated theory by many alternative health providers. This talk seeks to bring the whole subject of “adrenal fatigue” into the 21st century and proposes that the vast majority of seemingly adrenal-related complaints have little, in fact, to do with the adrenal glands themselves.

By:
Nora Gedgaudas, CNS, CNT
August 7, 2014, 2:05 pm to 2:45 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Resolving the Vitamin D Paradox: Are Vitamins A and K Required to Render Vitamin D a Heart-Protective Nutrient?
by Chris Masterjohn, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Resolving the Vitamin D Paradox: Are Vitamins A and K Required to Render Vitamin D a Heart-Protective Nutrient?

Paradoxically, vitamin D has the ability both to prevent and to cause heart disease. In both cases the mechanism involves pathological calcification of soft tissues. Recent evidence links commonly recommended doses of vitamin D to increased heart disease risk. Yet considerable evidence suggests that it is not just the dose of vitamin D, but other contextual factors, that determine whether this vitamin causes or prevents heart disease. This presentation will explore the roles of vitamins A and K, as well as other supportive nutrients and metabolic factors, in rendering vitamin D a heart-protective nutrient.

By:
Chris Masterjohn, Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 2:05 pm to 2:45 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Academics or Researchers
 
2:10 pm  
2:15 pm  
2:20 pm  
2:25 pm  
2:30 pm  
2:35 pm  
2:40 pm  
2:45 pm Break  
2:50 pm  
2:55 pm A Theory of Obesity, With Supporting Evidence from the Perfect Health Retreats
by Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

A Theory of Obesity, With Supporting Evidence from the Perfect Health Retreats

The causes of the obesity epidemic remain obscure, and attempted remedies have led to poor outcomes. I propose that dominant factors in obesity include malnutrition, circadian rhythm disruption, infections, and a disturbed gut microbiome; and that obesity is best addressed through diet and lifestyle interventions. In support of this view, I review both literature evidence and the remarkable weight loss success of the Perfect Health Retreats, an ancestral health program focused on nutrition and circadian rhythm entrainment. Although the program neither restricted calories nor prescribed intense physical activity, obese participants lost an average of 14 pounds in 30 days.

By:
Paul Jaminet, Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 2:55 pm to 3:35 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Clinicians
Paleolithic Diets and Blood Pressure Control: How Do We Think It Works?
by Lynda Frassetto, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Paleolithic Diets and Blood Pressure Control: How Do We Think It Works?

Paleolithic (Paleo) diets differ from modern diets in many ways, among these being that Paleo diets are often much lower in sodium salts (mainly sodium chloride or table salt) and higher in potassium salts. Both higher sodium chloride intakes and lower potassium intakes are associated with higher blood pressure and poorer blood pressure control. We will review what metabolic changes, such as lipid levels and insulin resistance, have been seen in clinical trials altering dietary intakes of sodium and potassium, and some potential pathophysiologic mechanisms.

By:
Lynda Frassetto, M.D.
August 7, 2014, 2:55 pm to 3:35 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Academics or Researchers
 
3:00 pm  
3:05 pm  
3:10 pm  
3:15 pm  
3:20 pm  
3:25 pm  
3:30 pm  
3:35 pm Break  
3:40 pm  
3:45 pm What Causes Leptin Resistance?
by Stephan Guyenet, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

What Causes Leptin Resistance?

Leptin is the primary hormonal regulator of body fatness. Obese people exhibit a resistance to leptin’s effects in the brain, causing the brain to oppose fat loss by multiple mechanisms. Research in animal models suggests that leptin resistance may be required for obesity to develop. How does leptin resistance occur, and what causes it? Research has not yet provided us with definitive answers, but several plausible possibilities have emerged. This talk will review what is known about leptin resistance and its causes.

By:
Stephan Guyenet, Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 3:45 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Academics or Researchers
The Gut; Diet, Flora, Health and Disease - Research and Recommendations
by Michael Ruscio, D.C., B.S.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Gut; Diet, Flora, Health and Disease - Research and Recommendations

The environment of westernized societies is vastly different than that seen in non-westernized societies or during our developmental history. Differing lines of data show that exposure to dirt and bugs cause disease while other data show exposure prevents disease. How do we account for this discordance? More importantly how do we use this data to become healthier? While there is still very much we do not know about this field, this talk will attempt to critically examine trends in the data so as to extract practical applications for the attendees.

By:
Michael Ruscio, D.C., B.S.
August 7, 2014, 3:45 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
3:50 pm  
3:55 pm  
4:00 pm  
4:05 pm  
4:10 pm  
4:15 pm  
4:20 pm  
4:25 pm Break  
4:30 pm  
4:35 pm Epigenetics and the Multigenerational Effects of Nutrition, Chemicals and Drugs
by Jill Escher, M.A., J.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Epigenetics and the Multigenerational Effects of Nutrition, Chemicals and Drugs

By now most of us know gene expression can be upregulated or downregulated by molecular factors including the metabolites of drugs, chemicals and nutrition. But what are the implications of this environmentally labile landscape, not only for our somatic (body) cells, but also our germ cells, which contain our genetic and epigenetic molecules of inheritance? In this presentation by a science philanthropist (Escher Fund for Autism) who focuses on cutting-edge gene-environment interaction research, you will learn:

• How genes respond to environmental cues.
• How evolutionary concepts are broadening to include environmental responsivity of genes and the germline.
• How, from a biological point of view, the human lifecycle begins about 20-40 years before conception with the dynamic, complex, and lengthy molecular phase of germline (egg and sperm) development.
• How, in light of the true breadth of the human lifecycle, risks of exposures are routinely underestimated.
• How ancestral health principles are critical to reducing pervasive and serious risks, and improve health across the generations.

The speaker, mother of two children with autism, will also share her experience as a member of the “guinea pig generation” heavily exposed in utero to novel synthetic drugs popular in the 1960s. Learn more about the work of the Escher Fund at GermlineExposures.org.

By:
Jill Escher, M.A., J.D.
August 7, 2014, 4:35 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Lifestyle and Autoimmune Disease: It's Still About Your Gut, but Not All About What You Eat
by Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Lifestyle and Autoimmune Disease: It's Still About Your Gut, but Not All About What You Eat

A variety of factors contribute to the development of autoimmune disease, among them genetics, leaky gut, and nutritional deficiencies. Although the power of therapeutic diets in the management of autoimmune disease is becoming increasingly recognized, an underemphasis on lifestyle contributors to immune dysfunction and gut health jeopardizes the efficacy of nutritional intervention. Chronic stress, inadequate sleep, inactivity and overtraining each negatively impact the health of the gut by interfering with digestion, damaging the gut barrier, or altering the gut microbiome. Understanding why and how to address lifestyle factors will enable the autoimmune disease patient to fully benefit from diet modifications.

By:
Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D.
August 7, 2014, 4:35 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
Paleo Fitness (Movement Session)
by Darryl Edwards, MSc
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Paleo Fitness (Movement Session)

Crank up the intensity with some classics, whilst introducing some variations you may never have experienced before. Be prepared to give it everything you have, play harder – featuring exercises and movement from the book "Paleo Fitness"

By:
Darryl Edwards, MSc
August 7, 2014, 4:35 pm to 5:15 pm
Hall: Wheeler Plaza
4:40 pm
4:45 pm
4:50 pm
4:55 pm
5:00 pm
5:05 pm
5:10 pm

Friday, 8th August 2014

Time Wheeler Auditorium Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Wheeler Plaza
9:00 am A Synthesis of Modern Exercise Physiology and Evolutionary Theory
by James Steele, BSc (Hons), Ph.D. Cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

A Synthesis of Modern Exercise Physiology and Evolutionary Theory

The approach of Ancestral Health utilises an evolutionary framework to explore interdisciplinary means of optimising health and fitness. Within its disciplines Ancestral Health often looks to partly inform practices based upon the Hominid fossil record and observation and emulation of extant hunter gatherers. However, within the discipline of exercise prescription there has been a lack of corroboration of anthropological data with evidence from modern exercise physiology. A more appropriate approach would be to learn from, as opposed to automatically accept emulating, hunter gatherer physical activity patterns. Thus this chapter will seek to examine and identify exercise variables (i.e. mode, intensity of effort/load, volume, frequency) common to extinct and extant hunter gatherers and then critically evaluate them with comparison to evidence from modern exercise physiology. From this, similarities and differences with regards to optimality for health and fitness outcomes will be highlighted and recommendations offered for exercise prescription.

By:
James Steele, BSc (Hons), Ph.D. Cand.
August 8, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Academics or Researchers
From Simple to Complex Patients
by C. Rick Henriksen, M.D., MPP, Lauren Noel, N.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

From Simple to Complex Patients

Naturopathic Doctors and Medical Doctors each approach patients with the goal of healing, however we each have different backgrounds and training. Come listen as an ND and MD share cases from their own practices. They will include both simple and complex patient cases and their individual and unique approaches. We will encourage audience participation in discussing potential management courses for the cases. This session is geared toward clinicians looking for practical ways to manage a wide variety of medical complaints using ancestral health principles.

By:
C. Rick Henriksen, M.D., MPP, Lauren Noel, N.D.
August 8, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Clinicians
Confronting Movement Dysfunction Using Primal Patterns (Movement Session)
by Georges Dagher, BAH, D.C. cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Confronting Movement Dysfunction Using Primal Patterns (Movement Session)

We are losing what was once as natural as breathing. Primal patterns, once-innate movements that are now rarely utilized in daily life, are essential to our overall health, range of motion, and mobility. This session connects various worlds of movement to alleviate pain caused by movement dysfunction— particularly via the synergistic roles of skeletal architecture and muscle— from a clinical anatomy perspective. Participants will apply various movements such as those associated with hunting and fishing to prepare their joints for daily activities. The session will incorporate movements such as climbing, pulling, crawling, dynamic and static balance, and mobility drills.

By:
Georges Dagher, BAH, D.C. cand.
August 8, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:40 am
Hall: Wheeler Plaza Track: the Layperson Type: movement
9:05 am
9:10 am
9:15 am
9:20 am
9:25 am
9:30 am
9:35 am
9:40 am Break Break  
9:45 am  
9:50 am Modern Masters of Misery
by Alex Baia, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Modern Masters of Misery

Post-industrial society has made human beings masters of unhappiness. We have too much stress, too much boring work, too little play, and too little real nourishment, both physical and mental. What a mess! Drawing upon the contemporary science of happiness, philosophical work on well-being, and ideas from the burgeoning ancestral health movement, I argue that we can get out of the mess by enjoining sound empirical psychology alongside ancestral wisdom.

By:
Alex Baia, Ph.D.
August 8, 2014, 9:50 am to 10:10 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
9:55 am The Underappreciated Role of Muscle in Health and Disease
by Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Underappreciated Role of Muscle in Health and Disease

Despite an ever growing body of literature pointing to muscle mass forming an integral part of our health, be it from a functional or endocrine perspective, the focus of public health guidelines and common clinician advice remains primarily focused on strategies to reduce fat mass only. For example, with public dietary guidelines weighted heavily toward a reduction in saturated fat intake, consumption high-quality protein sources have decreased because of the association between protein and saturated fat. This despite evidence suggesting animal protein is the optimal protein source for maintaining muscle mass. With the likes of sarcopenia and dynapenia becoming more apparent in our communities, an ancestral health prescription might become the best way to simultaneously achieve a lower visceral fat mass and a higher muscle mass.

By:
Jamie Scott, PGDipNutMed, PGDipSportExMed
August 8, 2014, 9:55 am to 10:35 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Academics or Researchers
 
10:00 am  
10:05 am  
10:10 am Break  
10:15 am Ancestral Mental Health: Applied Evolutionary Psychology
by Nando Pelusi, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Ancestral Mental Health: Applied Evolutionary Psychology

Understanding why we do what we do and feel as we do often has roots in adaptations that solved problems of daily living for most of human history. Clinical psychology often fails to distinguish circumstances that are evolutionarily familiar from those that are evolutionarily novel, such living among strangers, large social networks, alcohol, high-calorie food, travel, etc. An evolutionary treatment of depression, anxiety, panic, social phobias, anger, and shame can mine research from Evolutionary Psychology.

By:
Nando Pelusi, Ph.D.
August 8, 2014, 10:15 am to 10:35 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
10:20 am  
10:25 am  
10:30 am  
10:35 am Break  
10:40 am  
10:45 am Resistance Training, Brain Structure, and Brain Function
by Skyler Tanner, M.S.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Resistance Training, Brain Structure, and Brain Function

Using the measurements available, early Exercise Science focused on cardiorespiratory training and its ability to improve function and wellness in human beings. As measures have become more sensitive, resistance training has shown to provide similar and sometimes greater benefits than cardiorespiratory training specifically in regards to brain health. This presentation will examine the research conclusions and clinical outcomes from resistance training's affect on brain structure and brain function.

By:
Skyler Tanner, M.S.
August 8, 2014, 10:45 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Fitness Professionals
Mood and Anxiety in the Perinatal Patient: The Inflammatory Model
by Kelly Brogan, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Mood and Anxiety in the Perinatal Patient: The Inflammatory Model

10-15% of women experience mood disorders during and after pregnancy and 1 in 4 women will begin pregnancy on psychiatric medications. Despite accumulating data around antidepressant treatment during this time, many women express preferences for alternative treatment but are limited by a "meds vs no meds" binary model of care. When depression is viewed as an endpoint of multiple different modifiable lifestyle contributors, changes in environment, stress management, diet, and behavior can result in alleviation of symptoms and more optimal health for mother and baby. Inflammatory models of depression and postpartum depression and anxiety will be explored. Evidence-based non-medication treatments are available including SAMe, B vitamins (methyl-folate, B12), vitamin D, Omega fatty acids, cranial stimulation, probiotics, and mindfulness interventions.

By:
Kelly Brogan, M.D.
August 8, 2014, 10:45 am to 11:25 am
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Clinicians
 
10:50 am  
10:55 am  
11:00 am  
11:05 am  
11:10 am  
11:15 am  
11:20 am  
11:25 am Break  
11:30 am  
11:35 am Ancestral Health for Women in the Modern World: the HPA Axis Meets the HPT and the HPG Axes
by Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D., Stacy Toth, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Ancestral Health for Women in the Modern World: the HPA Axis Meets the HPT and the HPG Axes

The evolutionary biology perspective has proven to be an invaluable tool in creating dietary guidelines for the optimal human diet. However, we are learning that there may be stark differences between optimal nutrition for women versus men. In particular, the female body responds differently to changes in macronutrient ratio as well as meal timing due to links between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and both the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axes, in part due to the combined roles of leptin and cortisol. Women may experience adverse health effects, including hypothyroidism and hypothalamic amenorrhea, in response to low carbohydrate diets and intermittent fasting.

By:
Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D., Stacy Toth, B.A.
August 8, 2014, 11:35 am to 12:15 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Plant Food Toxins in an Evolutionary Context
by George Diggs, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Plant Food Toxins in an Evolutionary Context

Over the past several decades, tremendous strides have been made in the study of plant chemical defenses. These defenses include digestibility reducers, semiochemicals, hormone mimics, photosensitizers, cyanogenic compounds, and a variety of other toxins that interfere with herbivore structure or metabolism. A great deal is now known about their effects in a wide variety of animals ranging from insects to mammals. The toxic or otherwise damaging compounds in plants eaten by humans (e.g., gluten, hormone mimics, some lectins, photosensitizers, saponins, etc.) will be examined in the broader context of a widespread and evolutionarily old arms race between plants and animals.

By:
George Diggs, Ph.D.
August 8, 2014, 11:35 am to 12:15 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: Academics or Researchers
 
11:40 am  
11:45 am  
11:50 am  
11:55 am  
12:00 pm  
12:05 pm  
12:10 pm  
12:15 pm Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall  
12:20 pm  
12:25 pm  
12:30 pm  
12:35 pm  
12:40 pm  
12:45 pm  
12:50 pm  
12:55 pm  
1:00 pm  
1:05 pm  
1:10 pm  
1:15 pm  
1:20 pm  
1:25 pm  
1:30 pm  
1:35 pm  
1:40 pm  
1:45 pm The Ketogenic Diet for Cancer
by Colin Champ, M.D., Dawn Lemanne, M.D., Dominic D'Agostino, Ph.D., Ellen Davis, B.A., Jimmy Moore, Miriam Kalamian, EdM, MS, CNS, Rachel Albert, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Ketogenic Diet for Cancer

Scientific research is examining the use of a ketogenic diet as a means for slowing the growth of cancerous tumors. Cancer is now the #2 cause of death in the United States and yet mainstream medicine seeks out pharmaceutical answers for treating this disease. But preliminary trials have shown great promise that shifting to a low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat diet can literally starve cancer cells, which thrive on glucose but cannot survive on the ketones produced by carbohydrate-restricted diets. The panel will discuss this emerging field of science during the first half. The second half will then be devoted to putting the diet into practice.

By:
Colin Champ, M.D., Dawn Lemanne, M.D., Dominic D'Agostino, Ph.D., Ellen Davis, B.A., Jimmy Moore, Miriam Kalamian, EdM, MS, CNS, Rachel Albert, B.A.
August 8, 2014, 1:45 pm to 3:15 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson Type: panel
How We Got Fat (and Sick): Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Adipose Dynamics, and the Ratchet Effect
by J. Stanton, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

How We Got Fat (and Sick): Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Adipose Dynamics, and the Ratchet Effect

The question "Why are we gaining weight?" neglects an equally important question: "Why can't we lose the weight we gain?" The multiplicity of competing hypotheses, and the overwhelming failure rate of current interventions, suggests that current top-down paradigms, in which the brain controls fat mass, are incorrect. Based on current peer-reviewed research, a new, bottom-up paradigm is proposed, in which the energy requirements of individual cells both cause and predict fat gain, metabolic dysfunction, and the failure of fat loss. It will be shown that this bottom-up paradigm has both explanatory and predictive power lacking in current top-down models.

By:
J. Stanton, B.A.
August 8, 2014, 1:45 pm to 2:25 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson
 
1:50 pm  
1:55 pm  
2:00 pm  
2:05 pm  
2:10 pm  
2:15 pm  
2:20 pm  
2:25 pm Break  
2:30 pm Specific Requirements and Health Benefits of Strength Training for Women
by Stacy Toth, B.A., Stephanie Gaudreau, BS, MA, CHNP
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Specific Requirements and Health Benefits of Strength Training for Women

Although it is generally known that exercise is beneficial for health, recommendations continue to be provided for cardiovascular exercise and high-volume low-weight repetitions. Specifically for women plagued with osteoporosis, low muscle mass, reproductive hormonal dysregulation and a myriad of chronic health conditions, such recommendations can be counterproductive to long-term health. This discussion will explore the details on what specifics of strength training, including minimum effective dose, physiological differences on types of training, hormetic stressors, and more in order to obtain health improvements to bone density, muscle mass, energy levels, hormone regulation, improved balance and flexibility, and increased metabolic rate at rested state. Lastly, we will explore the biological "fitness" of women versus modern day perceptions of such definition being related to thinness.

By:
Stacy Toth, B.A., Stephanie Gaudreau, BS, MA, CHNP
August 8, 2014, 2:30 pm to 2:50 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall Track: the Layperson Type: 20 minute
 
2:35 pm  
2:40 pm  
2:45 pm  
2:50 pm    
2:55 pm    
3:00 pm    
3:05 pm    
3:10 pm    
3:15 pm Break    
3:20 pm Performance, Body Composition and Well-being Outcomes in New Zealand Multisporters Following a Ketogenic Diet
by Caryn Zinn, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Performance, Body Composition and Well-being Outcomes in New Zealand Multisporters Following a Ketogenic Diet

In a case study design, five multisporters underwent a 10-week ketogenic dietary intervention. Outcome variables related to sports performance, body composition and feelings of well-being, and were measured at baseline and at 10 weeks. All athletes reduced their body fat (range: 20-37.4mm using sum of 8 skinfolds), but experienced performance decrements. These expected findings will be discussed along with the unexpected findings of improved well-being. Despite performance decrements, athletes were keen to continue to simulate low carbohydrate high fat eating habits in the future as a result of the unexpected health benefits that they received from this dietary regime.

By:
Caryn Zinn, Ph.D.
August 8, 2014, 3:20 pm to 3:40 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Nutrition Professionals
   
3:25 pm    
3:30 pm    
3:35 pm    
3:40 pm Break  
3:45 pm Poster Session
by Alyssa Rhoden, Ph.D., Andrea Culbertson, M.S., R.D., Ben Greenfield, M.S., CSCS, C-ISSN, Elke Nelson, Ph.D., Jamie Guined, M.Ed., MBA, Jim Cross, N.D., L. Ac., Kendall Kendrick, NTA, Marc Bubbs, N.D., BSc, Nathan Brammeier, M.S., Ryan Lazarus, MS, CNS, DC, IFMCP, Stephanie Welch, Summer Innanen, CNP, BBA
View Details Attend
   
3:50 pm    
3:55 pm 3:55 Book Sale and Signing with Rachel Albert, Sarah Ballantyne, Colin Champ, Andrea Culbertson, Kaayla Daniel, George Diggs, Darryl Edwards, Jill Escher, Richard Feinman, Nora Gedgaudas, Esther Gokhale
by Andrea Culbertson, M.S., R.D., Colin Champ, M.D., Darryl Edwards, MSc, Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., A.B., George Diggs, Ph.D., Jill Escher, M.A., J.D., Kaayla Daniel, Ph.D., CCN, Nora Gedgaudas, CNS, CNT, Rachel Albert, B.A., Richard Feinman, Ph.D., Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

3:55 Book Sale and Signing with Rachel Albert, Sarah Ballantyne, Colin Champ, Andrea Culbertson, Kaayla Daniel, George Diggs, Darryl Edwards, Jill Escher, Richard Feinman, Nora Gedgaudas, Esther Gokhale

The listed presenters will sell and sign their books in the Bancroft Hotel's Great Hall. Each presenter will accept payment directly from purchasers. Please be prepared to pay with cash or checks, though some speakers may have the capability to accept credit cards.

By:
Andrea Culbertson, M.S., R.D., Colin Champ, M.D., Darryl Edwards, MSc, Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., A.B., George Diggs, Ph.D., Jill Escher, M.A., J.D., Kaayla Daniel, Ph.D., CCN, Nora Gedgaudas, CNS, CNT, Rachel Albert, B.A., Richard Feinman, Ph.D., Sarah Ballantyne, H.B.Sc., Ph.D.
August 8, 2014, 3:55 pm to 4:35 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall
 
4:00 pm  
4:05 pm  
4:10 pm  
4:15 pm  
4:20 pm  
4:25 pm  
4:30 pm  
4:35 pm Break  
4:40 pm  
4:45 pm 4:45 Book Sale and Signing with Eric Goodman, Ben Greenfield, Paul Jaminet, Miriam Kalamian, Dawn Lemanne, Denise Minger, Jimmy Moore, Diana Rodgers, Cate Shanahan, J Stanton, Stacy Toth, Joshua Turknett
by Ben Greenfield, M.S., CSCS, C-ISSN, Cate Shanahan, M.D., Dawn Lemanne, M.D., Denise Minger, Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., RD Cand., Eric Goodman, D.C., J. Stanton, B.A., Jimmy Moore, Joshua Turknett, M.D., Miriam Kalamian, EdM, MS, CNS, Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Stacy Toth, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

4:45 Book Sale and Signing with Eric Goodman, Ben Greenfield, Paul Jaminet, Miriam Kalamian, Dawn Lemanne, Denise Minger, Jimmy Moore, Diana Rodgers, Cate Shanahan, J Stanton, Stacy Toth, Joshua Turknett

The listed presenters will sell and sign their books in the Bancroft Hotel's Great Hall. Each presenter will accept payment directly from purchasers. Please be prepared to pay with cash or checks, though some speakers may have the capability to accept credit cards.

By:
Ben Greenfield, M.S., CSCS, C-ISSN, Cate Shanahan, M.D., Dawn Lemanne, M.D., Denise Minger, Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., RD Cand., Eric Goodman, D.C., J. Stanton, B.A., Jimmy Moore, Joshua Turknett, M.D., Miriam Kalamian, EdM, MS, CNS, Paul Jaminet, Ph.D., Stacy Toth, B.A.
August 8, 2014, 4:45 pm to 5:25 pm
Hall: Bancroft Hotel Great Hall
 
4:50 pm  
4:55 pm  
5:00 pm  
5:05 pm  
5:10 pm  
5:15 pm  
5:20 pm  
5:25 pm    

Saturday, 9th August 2014

Time Wheeler Auditorium VLSB 2050 Wheeler Plaza
9:00 am Stress and Heart Rate Variability
by Jason Moore, B.A.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Stress and Heart Rate Variability

As we dive deeper into the Ancestral living framework, all roads eventually lead to stress and adaptation. This applies to everything from food sensitivities and poor movement quality to lack of strong social connections and more. Stress causes adaptations. Our bodies are a manifestation of the cumulative adaptations we have developed from various stressors. Learn to measure stress, identify it's sources, and control it to conquer almost any health or performance goal. I will cover hormesis, allostasis, autonomic nervous system function, and heart rate variability. Also, how to apply this knowledge to guide appropriate Ancestral-based lifestyle changes.

By:
Jason Moore, B.A.
August 9, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Healthy Foods That Are Cruel: Social Justice in the Food Industry
by Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., RD Cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Healthy Foods That Are Cruel: Social Justice in the Food Industry

Just because it's not happening here, doesn't mean it's not happening. Diana will walk us through some of the major social justice issues in the food industry. That post workout banana or that 85% dark chocolate could be supporting child labor or human trafficking. How do you know that a farmer was paid fairly for that coffee you're drinking? Which companies are ignoring these important issues? How can you make a socially conscious choice when it comes to good food. You'll learn some of the big issues in the fair trade food movement and how make informed choices.

By:
Diana Rodgers, N.T.P., RD Cand.
August 9, 2014, 9:00 am to 9:20 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: the Layperson
 
9:05 am  
9:10 am  
9:15 am  
9:20 am Break Break  
9:25 am  
9:30 am Migraine as the Hypothalamic Distress Signal
by Joshua Turknett, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Migraine as the Hypothalamic Distress Signal

Though meaningful progress has been made in recent years on the pathophysiological correlates of disparate migrainous phenomema, a unifying model of migraine pathogenesis has remained elusive, frustrating clinical attempts to treat its root cause. This progress has included the identification of the hypothalamus as the putative initiator of migraine pathophysiology. A growing body of evidence supports the efficacy of an ancestral diet for preventing migraines, beckoning us to redefine migraine as a disease of civilization, and providing us with a previously unexplored avenue for understanding migraine pathogenesis. Taken together, these observations suggest a unified pathogenetic theory of migraine as a mismatch disease of the hypothalamus, manifesting when homeostatic demands are outside the bounds of our evolutionary experience.

By:
Joshua Turknett, M.D.
August 9, 2014, 9:30 am to 9:50 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Clinicians
Coconut Gentrification in the Northern Coast of Ecuador: Who is to Blame?
by Pilar Egüez Guevara, Ph.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Coconut Gentrification in the Northern Coast of Ecuador: Who is to Blame?

For centuries coconut has been a staple in the diet of the Afro-descendant population of Esmeraldas, a province in the north western region of Ecuador. Based on ethnographic and historical analyses, I examine the sharp decline in coconut consumption among Esmeraldeños during recent decades in the context of shifting values among urban middle classes towards the food traditions of historically marginalized communities. I discuss how local and global trade flows and conflicting ideas about coconut and health, exacerbate economic and epistemic gaps that draw Esmeraldeños away from their native foods while simultaneously bringing them to major cities re-branded as healthy.

By:
Pilar Egüez Guevara, Ph.D.
August 9, 2014, 9:30 am to 9:50 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: the Layperson
 
9:35 am  
9:40 am  
9:45 am  
9:50 am Break Break  
9:55 am  
10:00 am The Relationship Between Activity, Good Health, and the Power of Play
by Darryl Edwards, MSc
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Relationship Between Activity, Good Health, and the Power of Play

If exercise came in pill form, we would only be too eager to take our keep-fit medicine. Even small doses extend longevity and prevent disease. Recent studies tell us that exercise reduces all-cause mortality risk, reduces cardiovascular related events, as well as warding off chronic lifestyle conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Even though most of us are aware that physical exercise is important, we are not aware of the sheer extent of its benefits and many of us do not do enough of it. It will be proposed that the lack of activity is more detrimental to long-term health than more recognizable risk factors.

By:
Darryl Edwards, MSc
August 9, 2014, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Primal Pacific: the Efficacy of a Culturally Appropriate LCHF Diet Trial for Reducing Health Risk Among Pacific Employees
by Mikki Williden, Ph.D
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Primal Pacific: the Efficacy of a Culturally Appropriate LCHF Diet Trial for Reducing Health Risk Among Pacific Employees

Pacific people in New Zealand are disproportionately represented in the health statistics with rapidly rising obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease rates that impact on both longevity and quality of life. Standard dietary recommendations to choose low fat, wholegrain carbohydrate foods and lean sources of animal protein are at odds with traditional Pacific food sources. I will present the results of a small feasibility trial that tested the efficacy of a low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) whole food approach to diet (Primal Pacific) designed around culturally appropriate food choices, when compared to current ‘best practice' recommendations for healthy eating in a Pacific employee group.

By:
Mikki Williden, Ph.D
August 9, 2014, 10:00 am to 10:20 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Academics or Researchers
 
10:05 am  
10:10 am  
10:15 am  
10:20 am Break Break  
10:25 am Native Paleo Functional Nutrition & Fitness
by Andrea Culbertson, M.S., R.D., Regina Aguilera, M.S., L.Ac
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Native Paleo Functional Nutrition & Fitness

Colonization by Europeans impacted Indigenous life-ways, dramatically shifting the health of pre-contact Natives towards the "diseases of lifestyle." Due to the Native healing and wellness movements beginning in the 1970's, much work has been done to empower Native people. Today, there is growing interest to once again embrace traditional lifestyle, hence the birth of Native Paleo- an emerging Pan-Native movement whose goal is to educate and support individuals, families and tribal communities in reclaiming their ancestral diets and activity levels. Participants will learn how diabetes, obesity and heart disease impact the Native population and how Native Paleo is one solution.

By:
Andrea Culbertson, M.S., R.D., Regina Aguilera, M.S., L.Ac
August 9, 2014, 10:25 am to 10:45 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: the Layperson
 
10:30 am Myopia: A Modern Yet Reversible Disease
by Todd Becker, M.S.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Myopia: A Modern Yet Reversible Disease

Myopia, or near-sightedness, is generally assumed to be an irreversible, genetically determined condition that can only be ameliorated with corrective lenses or surgery. Its prevalence is 30-40% in the U.S. and Europe, and more than 50% in some Asian countries, but it is rare in Africa and in pre-industrial cultures. The incidence of myopia correlates with IQ, school achievement, and industrialization, suggesting that an environmental factor is at work—namely, near-work. This talk will review the biology and epidemiology of myopia and present experimental evidence that myopia can be reversed naturally by specific focusing techniques and practices.

By:
Todd Becker, M.S.
August 9, 2014, 10:30 am to 11:10 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
 
10:35 am  
10:40 am  
10:45 am Break  
10:50 am Decolonizing the Diet: Teaching Early US History in the Home of Ancel Keys.
by Gideon Mailer, Ph.D
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Decolonizing the Diet: Teaching Early US History in the Home of Ancel Keys.

How can a professor in the humanities - and not the sciences - raise awareness about ancestral health principles within a large public research institution? How can young college students - many from wheat/soy-growing economies - learn about ancestral health principles through the early-US history survey course? And why is Minnesota an ideal testing ground? The University of Minnesota system benefits from public-private partnerships between its scientific research and agricultural grain interests. Yet two prominent groups in the state - Scandinavian descendants and Native Americans - are particularly amenable to ancestral health principles. By studying early-American history (c.1400-1900) many of these and other groups might "Decolonize the Diet", moving away from grains, legumes, and a low-fat paradigm - a new and exciting project uniting the historical study of early America and contemporary health initiatives in the Great Lakes region.

By:
Gideon Mailer, Ph.D
August 9, 2014, 10:50 am to 11:10 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Academics or Researchers
 
10:55 am  
11:00 am  
11:05 am  
11:10 am Break Break  
11:15 am  
11:20 am  
11:25 am Osteoporosis: A Bone to Pick With Conventional Medicine
by Paul Ralston, D.C.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Osteoporosis: A Bone to Pick With Conventional Medicine

It is still common belief, even among physicians, that osteoporosis is an inevitable result of aging and a disease of calcium deficiency. After decades of dairy advertisements, calcium promotion, and prescription drugs to combat this dreaded condition, little has changed in positive outcomes. With over 75% of women over the age of 80 at an increased risk of fracture, it's time to take a different approach to understanding, treating, and preventing this modern disease.

By:
Paul Ralston, D.C.
August 9, 2014, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
The Role of Institutions and Rationality in the Emergence of an Obesity Epidemic
by James Woodward, MPP
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The Role of Institutions and Rationality in the Emergence of an Obesity Epidemic

Simplified models of obesity's causes have led to simplistic explanations for the choices and behaviors that would lead to an obesity epidemic in a heterogeneous population of consumers positioned in a market characterized by risk, uncertainty and complexity. Models from nutrition, economics and other social sciences, while intuitive, are empirically unverifiable and frequently at odds with everyday experience and observation. I present a model of behavior motivated by an assumption that individuals engage in "satisficing" behavior to alleviate their obesity but may fail to do so because of institutional failure in the realm of nutrition and its related public policies.

By:
James Woodward, MPP
August 9, 2014, 11:25 am to 11:45 am
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Academics or Researchers
 
11:30 am  
11:35 am  
11:40 am  
11:45 am Break Break  
11:50 am Approaching Immortality - Maintaining Youthful Physiology as We Age
by Daniel Stickler, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Approaching Immortality - Maintaining Youthful Physiology as We Age

Aging is a disease that kills over 100,000 people each day. We age because;
1.) We gradually build up byproducts of metabolism in our cells that will outpace our ability to get rid of them,
2.) We have a biologic hourglass called telomeres, and
3.) We accumulate toxic and damaging waste products in our extracellular compartments.
We can alter these responses through many lifestyle mechanisms; nutrition, exercise, stress, and environmental exposures and if we stave off frailty long enough, we may be alive long enough to take advantage of major life extension technology.

By:
Daniel Stickler, M.D.
August 9, 2014, 11:50 am to 12:10 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
How Do We Get Out Of This Modern Mess? Primality And The Sustainability Revolution
by Hilary Bromberg, B.S., Ph.D. cand.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

How Do We Get Out Of This Modern Mess? Primality And The Sustainability Revolution

Here's the fundamental problem with modern civilization: our brains and bodies spent millions of years evolving in an environment which bears little resemblance to the world most of us now inhabit. How do we get out of this mess? This presentation introduces a new framework for social change based on ethnographic data, which explains the sustainability revolution in evolutionary psychology terms. It has broad and deep implications for understanding human behavior and creating behavior change. This talk brings together an enormous range of cultural indicators — from fringe to mainstream — and suggests that paleo is not a fringy fad — it’s part of the broader sustainability revolution that’s changing the world for good.

By:
Hilary Bromberg, B.S., Ph.D. cand.
August 9, 2014, 11:50 am to 12:10 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: the Layperson
 
11:55 am  
12:00 pm  
12:05 pm  
12:10 pm Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall
by AHS
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall

By:
AHS
August 9, 2014, 12:10 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Break
Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall
by AHS
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Lunch at Crossroads Dining Hall

By:
AHS
August 9, 2014, 12:10 pm to 1:50 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Break
 
12:15 pm  
12:20 pm  
12:25 pm  
12:30 pm  
12:35 pm  
12:40 pm  
12:45 pm  
12:50 pm  
12:55 pm  
1:00 pm  
1:05 pm  
1:10 pm  
1:15 pm  
1:20 pm 1:20-1:40 PM Foundation Training Community Class
by Eric Goodman, D.C.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

1:20-1:40 PM Foundation Training Community Class

Join Dr. Goodman for a Foundation Training class, open to all AHS speakers and attendees immediately preceding his lecture. Experience simple movements and exercises that can have a drastic affect on posture, pain and overall wellness. 20 minutes.

By:
Eric Goodman, D.C.
August 9, 2014, 1:20 pm to 1:45 pm
Hall: Wheeler Plaza Track: the Layperson
1:25 pm
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:40 pm
1:45 pm  
1:50 pm Bone Broth and Health: A Look at the Science
by Kaayla Daniel, Ph.D., CCN
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Bone Broth and Health: A Look at the Science

A South American proverb claims "Good broth will resurrect the dead." While that's clearly an exaggeration, chicken soup has enjoyed a reputation as "Jewish penicillin" and bone broths are served to convalescents all over the world. In this presentation, Dr. Daniel will review the science that supports consuming bone broth for healthy bones, joints, skin, digestion, immunity and emotional stability. She will discuss 19th and early 20th century studies on gelatin, as well as recent investigations into the "conditionally essential" amino acids proline, glycine and glutamine and "the essential sugars" N-Acetylglucosamine and N-Acetylgalactosamine. Finally, she will report on Dr. John F. Prudden's clinical trials healing osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's, and even cancer with cartilage. In short, much science supports the ancestral wisdom of consuming bone broth.

By:
Kaayla Daniel, Ph.D., CCN
August 9, 2014, 1:50 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: Nutrition Professionals
Complacent Adaptation and Chronic Pain
by Eric Goodman, D.C.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Complacent Adaptation and Chronic Pain

Bad backs, bum knees, chronic headaches and an unwelcome variety of other chronic ailments may be the true plague of modern society. We are complacently adapting to our seated and sedentary culture and it is deteriorating the natural movement of our muscular body as it clouds our mental clarity. Foundation Training is an innovative movement program that mitigates this damage and allows us to become pain-free, stronger and rather well postured, naturally. Foundation Training teaches the body to properly support itself by first strengthening the Posterior Chain to bring the body into better balance.

By:
Eric Goodman, D.C.
August 9, 2014, 1:50 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Clinicians Type: movement
 
1:55 pm  
2:00 pm  
2:05 pm  
2:10 pm  
2:15 pm  
2:20 pm  
2:25 pm  
2:30 pm Break Break  
2:35 pm  
2:40 pm The First Paleo Food: It's Breastmilk and It's Alive!
by Philip Goscienski, M.D., F.A.A.P.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

The First Paleo Food: It's Breastmilk and It's Alive!

Before the Agricultural Revolution a human's first culinary experience consisted of breastmilk. A biological system that evolved from a modification of sweat glands took more than five million years to become an extremely complex form of sustenance for newborn mammals. The most obvious benefit of breastfeeding is that it provides a complete nutritional system that will sustain an individual until it can forage for food. That is only part of the story. Breastfeeding has a major influence on immunity, brain development, future chronic diseases and the health of the breastfeeding mother.

By:
Philip Goscienski, M.D., F.A.A.P.
August 9, 2014, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
Bent Out of Shape?
by Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., A.B.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Bent Out of Shape?

Human beings have bent forward for millenia to reach, gather, and lift. In modern times, bending has become a problematic activity associated with back pain and pathology.

Modern ways of bending differ significantly from those observed in non-industrial cultures. Modern guidelines on bending are also very different from traditional patterns.

Esther Gokhale presents the merits of hip-hinging, the bending pattern of our ancestors, and shows how it can help us avoid disc damage, ligament laxity, and muscle dysfunction. Using slides from her travels in Africa, India, Israel, and elsewhere, Gokhale will help the audience experience the safety and comfort of a small degree of hip-hinging.

By:
Esther Gokhale, L.Ac., A.B.
August 9, 2014, 2:40 pm to 3:20 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: the Layperson
 
2:45 pm  
2:50 pm  
2:55 pm  
3:00 pm  
3:05 pm  
3:10 pm  
3:15 pm  
3:20 pm Book Signing with Philip Goscienski
by Philip Goscienski, M.D., F.A.A.P.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Book Signing with Philip Goscienski

By:
Philip Goscienski, M.D., F.A.A.P.
August 9, 2014, 3:20 pm to 3:35 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium
Break  
3:25 pm  
3:30 pm  
3:35 pm It's Your Parents Fault! Methylation: How 1 Carbon Affects Your Brain, Your DNA and Everything in Between
by Tim Gerstmar, N.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

It's Your Parents Fault! Methylation: How 1 Carbon Affects Your Brain, Your DNA and Everything in Between

Why is it that some people don't get better in spite of a good diet and lifestyle? One recently identified issue is defects in methylation, the epigenetic process by which the body turns on and off almost every process in the body. While normally methylation works seamlessly and without any need for conscious control, mutations in the methylation genes can 'gum up the works' and lead to chronic health issues. Our ability to identify genes has recently allowed us to peer inside this process, identify dysfunctional methylation genes, and provide help for suffering people.

By:
Tim Gerstmar, N.D.
August 9, 2014, 3:35 pm to 4:15 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium Track: the Layperson
More Than Bones: Muscle Strength, Physiology, and an Ancestral Approach to Back Pain
by Matt Smith, M.D.
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

More Than Bones: Muscle Strength, Physiology, and an Ancestral Approach to Back Pain

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common reasons to visit a physician. This condition is often disabling to the patient and it is an enormous economic burden secondary to both direct and indirect costs. While CLBP is very common, diagnosis of its etiology is often difficult. It is widely known that there is not a one to one correlation with anatomic pathology as seen with radiographic imaging of the spine and CLBP as experienced by the patient. Surgery, percutaneous image-guided procedures, oral medication, and traditional physical therapy are widely used to address CLBP, though often with limited success. Yet, there has been little clinical attention to date on the therapeutic effect of improved physical strength and hypertrophy of the muscles surrounding the spine. Nonetheless, there is ample evidence in the literature that hypertrophy of the muscles that support the spine is inversely correlated with CLBP. There is also evidence that a wide variety of factors, physiological and otherwise, are major determinants of the nature and severity of this condition. It is thus proposed that many of the structural abnormalities commonly attributed to CLBP are only a relatively small part of its overall etiology. This implies that a normalization of muscle strength and the adoption of behaviors promoting the optimal physiological milieu of the spine may be the optimal treatment for the vast majority of individuals with CLBP. Thus while CLBP is a condition endemic to both modern and ancestral societies, there appear to be mechanisms innate to human physiology that we may better utilize to combat this condition.

By:
Matt Smith, M.D.
August 9, 2014, 3:35 pm to 4:15 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050 Track: Clinicians
 
3:40 pm  
3:45 pm  
3:50 pm  
3:55 pm  
4:00 pm  
4:05 pm  
4:10 pm  
4:15 pm Break Head over to WHEELER HALL for closing remarks.
by AHS
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Head over to WHEELER HALL for closing remarks.

By:
AHS
August 9, 2014, 4:15 pm to 4:25 pm
Hall: VLSB 2050
 
4:20 pm  
4:25 pm Closing remarks
by Tess McEnulty, Katherine Morrison
View Details Attend
 Attend Link

Closing remarks

By:
Tess McEnulty, Katherine Morrison
August 9, 2014, 4:25 pm to 4:40 pm
Hall: Wheeler Auditorium
   
4:30 pm    
4:35 pm    

Legend

 Break the Layperson Academics or Researchers Clinicians
 Fitness Professionals Nutrition Professionals